Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice now available for PC on the Microsoft Store

PC gamers can now pick up Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice for PC on the Microsoft Store.

Just a week after launching on Xbox One, the critically acclaimed Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice is now available on the Microsoft Store for Windows 10 PCs as well.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wmexperts/~3/Jfra26004FE/hellblade-senuas-sacrifice-now-available-pc-microsoft-store

Battlezone brings arcade tank warfare to Xbox One soon

Battlezone is finally coming to Xbox One after its PC and PlayStation VR debut.

Battlezone is a first-person arcade tank combat game originally developed by Atari back in 1980. It’s regarded as a cult franchise by many gamers around the world. Many months ago, a new installment was released by Rebellion, but it was exclusive to PC and PlayStation VR. Luckily, that’s about to change very soon!

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wmexperts/~3/J1Bms7web7g/battlezone-brings-arcade-tank-warfare-xbox-one-soon

Fortnite Fridays will bring weekly battle royale action to Microsoft Stores

The weekly event will bring players together in person to battle it out in Fortnite at their local Microsoft Stores.

Epic’s Fortnite has been a bit of a sensation in the battle royale genre, and Microsoft is looking to hop on the train.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wmexperts/~3/j_E-95Avh-8/fortnite-fridays-will-bring-weekly-battle-royale-action-microsoft-stores

Dell XPS 15 2-in-1 vs. HP Spectre x360 15: AMD graphics and Intel CPUs

Big Ultrabooks, big power.

HP’s Spectre x360 lineup has proven itself as one of the finest 2-in-1 Ultrabooks on the market, but it doesn’t exist without some competition. Whereas Dell’s XPS lineup was for a couple of years strictly a clamshell notebook series, there are now 2-in-1 options for both the XPS 13 and XPS 15. Let’s take a look at the larger Dell laptop and see how well it compares to the tried and true (and refreshed for 2018!) Spectre x360 15.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wmexperts/~3/nesk9oGxSPA/dell-xps-15-2-1-vs-hp-spectre-x360-15

Facebook moves to shrink its legal liabilities under GDPR

Facebook has another change in the works to respond to the European Union’s beefed up data protection framework — and this one looks intended to shrink its legal liabilities under GDPR, and at scale.
Late yesterday Reuters reported on a change incoming to Facebook’s T&Cs that it said will be pushed out next month — meaning all non-EU international are switched from having their data processed by Facebook Ireland to Facebook USA.
With this shift, Facebook will ensure that the privacy protections afforded by the EU’s incoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) — which applies from May 25 — will not cover the ~1.5BN+ international Facebook users who aren’t EU citizens (but current have their data processed in the EU, by Facebook Ireland).
The U.S. does not have a comparable data protection framework to GDPR. While the incoming EU framework substantially strengthens penalties for data protection violations, making the move a pretty logical one for Facebook’s lawyers thinking about how it can shrink its GDPR liabilities.
Reuters says Facebook confirmed the impending update to the T&Cs of non-EU international users, though the company played down the significance — repeating its claim that it will be making the same privacy “controls and settings” available everywhere. (Though, as experts have pointed out, this does not mean the same GDPR principles will be applied by Facebook everywhere.)
Critics have couched the T&Cs shift as regressive — arguing it’s a reduction in the level of privacy protection that would otherwise have applied for international users, thanks to GDPR. Although whether these EU privacy rights would really have been enforceable for non-Europeans is questionable.
At the time of writing Facebook had not responded to a request for comment on the change. Update: It’s now sent us the following statement — attributed to deputy chief global privacy officer, Stephen Deadman: “The GDPR and EU consumer law set out specific rules for terms and data policies which we have incorporated for EU users.  We have been clear that we are offering everyone who uses Facebook the same privacy protections, controls and settings, no matter where they live. These updates do not change that.” 
The company’s generally argument is that the EU law takes a prescriptive approach — which can make certain elements irrelevant for international users outside the bloc. It also claims it’s working on being more responsive to regional norms and local frameworks. (Which will presumably be music to the New Zealand privacy commissioner‘s ears, for one…)
According to Reuters the T&Cs shift will affect more than 70 per cent of Facebook’s 2BN+ users. As of December, Facebook had 239M users in the US and Canada; 370M in Europe; and 1.52BN users elsewhere.
The news agency also reports that Microsoft -owned LinkedIn is one of several other multinational companies planning to make the same data processing shift for international users — with LinkedIn’s new terms set to take effect on May 8, moving non-Europeans to contracts with the U.S.-based LinkedIn Corp.
In a statement to Reuters about the change LinkedIn also played it down, saying: “We’ve simply streamlined the contract location to ensure all members understand the LinkedIn entity responsible for their personal data.”
One interesting question is whether these sorts of data processing shifts could encourage regulators in international regions outside the EU to push for a similarly extraterritorial scope for their local privacy laws — or face their citizens’ data falling between the jurisdiction cracks via processing arrangements designed to shrink companies’ legal liabilities.

Interesting example of Delaware effect, however if other jurisdictions are smart they will have their own art 3 GDPR, that would be Brussels effect. Be sure the lobbying has started. Now if ever we need thinkers (who are also doers) like @linnetelwin
— Mireille Hildebrandt (@mireillemoret) April 19, 2018

Another interesting question is how Facebook (or any other multinationals making the same shift) can be entirely sure it’s not risking violating any of its EU users’ fundamental rights — i.e. if it accidentally misclassifies an individual as an non-EU international users and processes their data via Facebook USA.
Keeping data processing processes properly segmented can be difficult. As can definitively identifying a user’s legal jurisdiction based on their location (if that’s even available). So while Facebook’s contract change for international users looks largely intended to shrink its legal liabilities under GDPR, it’s possible the change will open up another front for individuals to pursue strategic litigation in the coming months.

Facebook moves to shrink its legal liabilities under GDPR

Animus Control Panel lets players mod Assassin's Creed Origins on PC

Assassin’s Creed Origins’ PC players can modify the game even further now.

PC games are known for their mods and Assassin’s Creed Origins is no different. Soon, Ubisoft will release an update for the acclaimed title on PC which adds the Animus Control Panel. The Animus Control Panel lets you to alter the game and considerably expand upon its foundations.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wmexperts/~3/d4SCkYZZk8s/animus-control-panel-lets-you-mod-assassins-creed-origins-pc

Can data science save social media?

Bob Ackerman Jr.
Contributor

Robert Ackerman Jr. is the founder and a managing director of Allegis Capital, an early-stage cybersecurity venture firm, and a founder of DataTribe, a startup “studio” for fledgling cyber startups staffed by former government technology innovators and cybersecurity professionals.

More posts by this contributor

The Trump team has failed to address the nation’s mounting cybersecurity threats
Changing the security landscape for entrepreneurs

The unfettered internet is too often used for malicious purposes and is frequently woefully inaccurate. Social media — especially Facebook — has failed miserably at protecting user privacy and blocking miscreants from sowing discord.
That’s why CEO Mark Zuckerberg was just forced to testify about user privacy before both houses of Congress. And now governmental regulation of Facebook and other social media appears to be a fait accompli.
At this key juncture, the crucial question is whether regulation — in concert with Facebook’s promises to aggressively mitigate its weaknesses — will correct the privacy abuses and continue to fulfill Facebook’s goal of giving people the power to build transparent communities, bringing the world closer together?
The answer is maybe.
What has not been said is that Facebook must embrace data science methodologies initially created in the bowels of the federal government to help protect its two billion users. Simultaneously, Facebook must still enable advertisers — its sole source of revenue — to get the user data required to justify their expenditures.
Specifically, Facebook must promulgate and embrace what is known in high-level security circles as homomorphic encryption (HE), often considered the “Holy Grail” of cryptography, and data provenance (DP). HE would enable Facebook, for example, to generate aggregated reports about its user psychographic profiles so that advertisers could still accurately target groups of prospective customers without knowing their actual identities.
Meanwhile, data provenance — the process of tracing and recording true identities and the origins of data and its movement between databases — could unearth the true identities of Russian perpetrators and other malefactors, or at least identify unknown provenance, adding much-needed transparency in cyberspace.
Both methodologies are extraordinarily complex. IBM and Microsoft, in addition to the National Security Agency, have been working on HE for years, but the technology has suffered from significant performance challenges. Progress is being made, however. IBM, for example, has been granted a patent on a particular HE method — a strong hint it’s seeking a practical solution — and last month proudly announced that its rewritten HE encryption library now works up to 75 times faster. Maryland-based ENVEIL, a startup staffed by the former NSA HE team, has broken the performance barriers required to produce a commercially viable version of HE, benchmarking millions of times faster than IBM in tested use cases.

How homomorphic encryption would help Facebook
HE is a technique used to operate on and draw useful conclusions from encrypted data without decrypting it, simultaneously protecting the source of the information. It is useful to Facebook because its massive inventory of personally identifiable information is the foundation of the economics underlying its business model. The more comprehensive the data sets about individuals, the more precisely advertising can be targeted.
HE could keep Facebook information safe from hackers and inappropriate disclosure, but still extract the essence of what the data tells advertisers. It would convert encrypted data into strings of numbers, do math with these strings, then decrypt the results to get the same answer it would if the data wasn’t encrypted at all.
A particularly promising sign for HE emerged last year, when Google revealed a new marketing measurement tool that relies on this technology to allow advertisers to see whether their online ads result in in-store purchases.
Unearthing this information requires analyzing data sets belonging to separate organizations, notwithstanding the fact that these organizations pledge to protect the privacy and personal information of the data subjects. HE skirts this by generating aggregated, non-specific reports about the comparisons between these data sets.
In pilot tests, HE enabled Google to successfully analyze encrypted data about who clicked on an advertisement in combination with another encrypted multi-company data set that recorded credit card purchase records. With this data in hand, Google was able to provide reports to advertisers summarizing the relationship between the two databases to conclude, for example, that five percent of the people who clicked on an ad wound up purchasing in a store.

Data provenance
Data provenance has a markedly different core principle. It’s based on the fact that digital information is atomized into 1s and 0s with no intrinsic truth. The dual digits exist only to disseminate information, whether accurate or widely fabricated. A well-crafted lie can easily be indistinguishable from the truth and distributed across the internet. What counts is the source of these 1s and 0s. In short, is it legitimate? What is the history of the 1s and 0s?
The art market, as an example, deploys DP to combat fakes and forgeries of the world’s greatest paintings, drawings and sculptures. It uses DP techniques to create a verifiable, chain-of-custody for each piece of the artwork, preserving the integrity of the market.
Much the same thing can be done in the online world. For example, a Facebook post referencing a formal statement by a politician, with an accompanying photo, would have provenance records directly linking the post to the politician’s press release and even the specifics of the photographer’s camera. The goal — again — is ensuring that data content is legitimate.
Companies such as Walmart, Kroger, British-based Tesco and Swedish-based H&M, an international clothing retailer, are using or experimenting with new technologies to provide provenance data to the marketplace.
Let’s hope that Facebook and its social media brethren begin studying HE and DP thoroughly and implement it as soon as feasible. Other strong measures — such as the upcoming implementation of the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, which will use a big stick to secure personally identifiable information — essentially should be cloned in the U.S. What is best, however, are multiple avenues to enhance user privacy and security, while hopefully preventing breaches in the first place. Nothing less than the long-term viability of social media giants is at stake.

Can data science save social media?

Extinction Xbox One review: A gargantuan $60 disappointment

Extinction is fun for a few hours, but it’s not even close to being worth the asking price.

Built around the concept of taking down Godzilla-sized foes with your trusty sword and legendary climbing skills, Shadow of the Colossus is widely regarded as one of the best games in history. Extinction, a brand new title for the Xbox One, attempts to recreate the magic of Colossus, but lacks the interesting story or great gameplay that made it special. The result is an experience that feels shallow and unsatisfying.

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/wmexperts/~3/AjleBZzmx3A/extinction-xbox-one-review-gargantuan-disappointment